The big news on Monday was the announcement that England batsman Jonathan Trott would be leaving the Ashes tour due to a 'stress-related illness' and returning home, with no intention of rejoining the tour.

While some reaction on Twitter was unsympathetic and ignorant of mental illness, the majority, including current and former players, was positive and supportive of the Warwickshire man.

Australia coach Darren Lehmann wrote: "I wish Johnathon Trott a speedy recovery from a tough situation, a safe flight home to be with family! #ashes"

Somerset captain Marcus Trescothick, one of the more famous cricketers to suffer from depression, said: "Sad news, hope trotty is ok. Let's not start pointing to many fingers at the reason why and how, let's just think about the man in the mist of it all."

Former England captain, and current pundit Michael Vaughan wrote, having been critical of Trott's batting in the first Ashes Test: "I do feel guilty for criticising Trott this week ... I wasn't to know what he was going through and I can only comment on what I see..."

Former England skipper and batsman Paul Collingwood wrote: "Cricket is important but your health is your life. Hope Trotty recovers enough to get back to the top #trott #ashes"

England fast bowler Stuart Broad, who did well at the Gabba, wrote of his support: "Love Trotty. Absolute champion of a man. He knows he has all the support of all the people around him. Puts cricket in perspective."

Former cricketer turned MMA fighter Adam Hollioake tweeted: "Sorry to hear Jonathon Trott leaving the Ashes (stress related illness) Life continually puts things into perspective..sport is for fun"

England T20 specialist Luke Wright added: "Hope Trotty is ok. The Ashes are important but there are bigger things in life than just cricket. Hope he is back well soon."

Scotland cricketer Rob Taylor echoed Wright, saying: "Sad news about Trott. Puts our sport into perspective. Just shows it's not as glamorous as some might think! Hope he has a full recovery!"

South African cricketer Gulam Bodi, who had earlier tweeted that Trott should 'man up', apologised, saying: "Id like to apologize to jonathan trott and any1 i may hav offended wit my completely insensitive comment, i wish him a speedy recovery."

Former New Zealand bowler Iain O'Brien, another outspoken supporter in the fight against mental illness, said: "All the best to Jonathan Trott and getting healthy again. The easier decision would have been to have stayed on the tour..."

He then commented on the number of insensitive/ignorant tweets, adding: "Do a Twitter search with "Trott" to see how many people still don't understand what mental illness is. It's a sickness. Not a choice."

Former Australia batsman Dean Jones tweeted: "I admire Trott for his courage asking for help! best of luck to him! #ashes #beyondblue"

Surrey fast bowler Stuart Meaker was full of support, saying: "Hope Trott gets the space he needs now to recover and I hope people start to realise how tough an environment international cricket is.

He added: "People are very quick to judge/comment/tweet about a player without knowing the full story and what's going on behind the scenes."

Australia spin legend and now-commentator Shane Warne tweeted: "Feeling for Jonathan Trott. I hope he and his family are left alone by all media and he's able to recover quickly and return to the Eng team!"

Another former Aussie bowler, Shaun Tait, also asked for perspective, saying: "Trott situation might make people realise that it is only a game and to relax the carry on that has been surrounding this ashes so far."

Former Sri Lanka coach and Australia batsman Tom Moody added: "Sorry to hear Jonathan Trott is leaving the tour quality player who I'm sure will bounce back, but his well-being is the priority. #Ashes"

Matthew Hayden, former Australia batsman, was short and sweet in his message, saying: "Wishing Jonathan Trott a speedy recovery #Ashes"

Sports psychologist and former England bowler Jeremy Snape added: "#Trott's withdrawal from the Ashes tour with stress related illness shows courage not weakness. 1 in 5 suffer in 'normal' life. #support"