'My name is Lou Vincent, and I am a cheat'

England

Former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent has released a full confessional statement in which he admits to match fixing, calls himself a 'cheat' and says he shamed his country by his actions.

Former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent has released a full confessional statement in which he admits to match fixing, calls himself a 'cheat' and says he shamed his country by his actions.

Vincent was implicated in match fixing around the world late last year, including 14 charges by the ECB for fixing a game while playing for Sussex, and also in the Champions League T20 for the Auckland Aces, and in the Bangladesh Premier League.

The statement started with: "My name is Lou Vincent and I am a cheat. I have abused my position as a professional sportsman on a number of occasions by choosing to accept money in fixing.

"I have lived with this dark secret for so many years, but months ago I reached the point where I decided I had to come forward and tell the truth.

"It's a truth that has rightly caused uproar and controversy in New Zealand and around the world. I have shamed my country, I have shamed my sport, I have shamed those close to me. And for that, I am not proud."

After thanking his family, and partner Susie for their support, he added: "Today is the day I offer my deepest, deepest apologies to the public and the cricketing world, to the loyal fans, to the dedicated coaches, staff, players past and present.

"I apologise to and thank the ACSU for the help and support that is out there for all players, that has helped me a great deal, Chris Morris and his legal team and all the associations that have handled the sensitive situation with professionalism and respect."

He then went on to say that while he suffered from depression, it was no excuse for his actions, and that he was an intelligent adult who knew right from wrong.

He continued: "The people who know me know I'm vulnerable, but they also know that I am not stupid. And I know what is right and what is wrong.

"I do suffer from depression – that is absolutely no excuse for all I've done wrong. I used to think mistakes were made by bad people, but now I even know that good people can make the worst of mistakes."

He then urged players to be vigilant about match-fixing, to resist temptations and to uphold the sport's ethics.

He added: "For sport to prosper, it is up to players to police the game, because they are the ones that will ultimately lose out and allow themselves to be used as pawns to make money.

"No one should ever be put in a position and no one should ever allow themselves to forget what sport is about and let money rule their decisions.

"The decisions I made were wrong. Players must be better than that; above reproach, for the fans, for the sport."

And he ended with: "It is entirely my fault and I'll never be able to stand in front of a game again.

"It's entirely my fault that I will not be able to apply my skills in a positive way to help future cricketers, but it is entirely possible that I can use this moment to convince others not to be tempted by wrongdoing.

"To do the right thing for themselves, for family and friends and for the sport they love.

"I accept my punishment."

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