ECB and CLT20 ban Vincent for life

England

Former New Zealand batsman Lou Vincent has been banned for life by the England and Wales Cricket Board, as well as by the Champions League T20, after confessing to numerous counts of match-fixing.

Former New Zealand batsman Lou Vincent has been banned for life by the England and Wales Cricket Board, as well as by the Champions League T20, after confessing to numerous counts of match-fixing.

Vincent had been charged with 14 counts by the ECB for his involvement in fixing for Sussex in 2011, as well as four other charges, and was also banned by the CLT20 after admitting to rigging games while playing for the Auckland Aces.

The bans came hot on the heels of a full confession he released on Tuesday, in which he called himself a 'cheat' and said he had shamed the sport and his country by his actions, and accepted all punishments.

The CLT20 released a statement saying: "Former Auckland Aces batsman Lou Vincent has been banned for life from participating in the tournament after pleading guilty to seven charges relating to spot fixing.

"It was found that Vincent attempted to corrupt two matches involving the Auckland Aces during the October 2012 CLT20 played in South Africa by entering into agreements with a bookmaker for financial gain.

"Six charges related to Vincent's conduct in the 10 October 2012 match between the Aces and Hampshire at Centurion and 15 October 2012 match between the Aces and Kolkata Knight Riders at Cape Town.

"He faced a further charge from his conduct during the 2011 CLT20, where he failed to report an approach from a bookmaker. The serious nature of Vincent's actions justified imposing the longest possible suspension under the CLT20 Code of Behaviour."

ECB chief David Collier said of the ban: "This has been a complex case which has crossed different cricketing jurisdictions and required close collaboration and intelligence-sharing between both our own anti-corruption unit, other domestic boards and the ICC's ACSU.

"We are extremely pleased that the matter has now been brought to a satisfactory conclusion and that an individual who repeatedly sought to involve others in corrupt activity for his own personal gain has accepted that his conduct warrants a lifetime ban from cricket. It once again highlights our resolve to keep cricket clean and rid the game of the tiny minority who seek to undermine the sport's integrity."

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