Fulton expects more spin in Dhaka

New Zealand

New Zealand opening batsman Peter Fulton is preparing himself for a turning track in Dhaka on Monday, when the second Test against Bangladesh takes place at the Shere Bangla National Stadium.

New Zealand opening batsman Peter Fulton is preparing himself for a turning track in Dhaka on Monday, when the second Test against Bangladesh takes place at the Shere Bangla National Stadium.

The first Test ended in a draw in Chittagong, with spinners from both sides doing well despite the slow and low deck. Sohag Gazi was the star of the show though, taking a hat-trick on the final day.

But 'Two-Meter Peter' is not content to wait for another stalemate, and knows the Tigers will also want to record a win in Mirpur, and it could come down to which side's spinners do a better job.

Fulton said: "We are definitely keen to win the match. I am sure Bangladesh will also be keen. So regardless of the wicket, both teams will try to get a result. It looks very dry, not a lot of grass on it.

"It is similar to the Chittagong game, preparing it to be low and slow. The wicket may turn more than it did in Chittagong. We are preparing for every scenario. It is not necessarily easy to get results.

"Five days is a long time in a Test match. If we improve on our first Test performance, we can get a result."

Fulton added that Kiwi spinners Ish Sodhi, who made his debut in Chittagong, and Kane Williamson will have a better chance at taking wickets in Dhaka, as long as they show the patience displayed by the home bowlers.

The opener added: "The Bangladesh spinners bowled well, as we expected them to. They kept it quite tight. They probably came into it a bit more on the last day when we were pushing for a declaration.

"Our spinners got better as the game went on. They can learn from the first Test. As a bowling unit, if we can be patient for a little bit longer, we will pick up wickets."

Fulton's efforts in the first Test were impressive as he made two half centuries, batting for long periods of time in the hot conditions. He hopes to do a better job the second time around, not that he's adjusted to the conditions.

The 34-year-old added: "It is not easy to bat here with the heat. You have to work hard for runs. We have to get off to a good start which will set the team up for a result.

"I found it hard in the first innings with the heat. Like all the guys, we adjusted little bit and found things a little bit easier."

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