ICC to trial two extra DRS reviews

Australia

The ICC Chief Executives' Committee (CEC) met in Dubai this week to discuss a range of issues, some of which will be considered by the ICC Board when they hold their fourth and last meeting of the year in London from 17-19 October.

The ICC Chief Executives' Committee (CEC) met in Dubai this week to discuss a range of issues, some of which will be considered by the ICC Board when they hold their fourth and last meeting of the year in London from 17-19 October.

One of the main talking points was the use of reviews in Tests, and it was decided that a trial period would see the number of DRS reviews topped up to two after 80 overs in an innings. So, if a side has used their reviews, they will get two more after 80 overs, but cannot have more than two at any time.

The ICC statement read: "It was also agreed that a trial will be conducted whereby a team's referrals will be topped-up to two reviews after 80 overs of an innings. This trial will start from 1 October 2013 in all Test matches in which the DRS is used, with the results being monitored and considered by the Working Group."

They also discussed using Snickometer in matches, as it's not part of the official system now, adding: "Noting that most of the contentious decisions relate to faint edges, the performance of the Real-Time Snickometer during the ICC Champions Trophy 2013 and the Ashes, and the potential to use this technology to assist the umpires in making these decisions was discussed.

"An independent assessment of this technology will be conducted before a decision is made on its inclusion in the list of approved DRS technologies."

The heads of the major cricketing countries also discussed the use of two balls during ODI matches, one from each end, and the members remained divided on the matter, thus retaining the current use of two balls.

They said: "The ICC Cricket Committee had recently reviewed the current ODI playing conditions which include provision for the use of two new balls per innings and had recommended that the playing conditions should remain unchanged. The CEC discussed the matter in detail.

"Following due consideration of the Cricket Committee's views and the arguments for and against retaining the two new balls provision, opinions of the CEC members remained divided and, as such, the current playing condition remains as is."

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson, reflecting on the meeting, said: "It has been an excellent engagement in which we discussed a series of issues, some of which will be taken forward to the ICC Board which will meet in London next month.

"The unanimous support for the authority of the umpires and commitment to the Spirit of Cricket was particularly pleasing."

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