Vincent reveals inner workings of match-fixing

England

Disgraced former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent has revealed how he was drawn into the world of match-fixing, which saw him banned from the game for life this week, and said it was his 'hero' who got him into it.

Disgraced former New Zealand cricketer Lou Vincent has revealed how he was drawn into the world of match-fixing, which saw him banned from the game for life this week, and said it was his 'hero' who got him into it.

Vincent released a full confession on Tuesday, admitting to being a 'cheat' and soon afterwards the ECB and Champions League T20 handed down life bans after he admitted to fixing matches in their domestic tournaments.

On Wednesday he then revealed how he was brought into the netherworld back in 2008, saying his 'hero' had gotten him into it after a bookie approached him at the ICL. Vincent said he had tried to report the first approach, but was convinced to continue.

He said on <i>Newstalk ZB</i> about the first time he was approached: "Then I go to my hero, knock on his door and then I am buzzing with this like, 'Wow, this has really happened, I have to tell someone the story'.

"I walk into the room and I just had to tell him straight away. 'This is what happened, I have been approached, this is what I have done, I have reported it to my agent, it's all being taken care of.'

"And there was an eerie silence for a couple of seconds, and then there's that deep breath and I always remember the face looking over me saying,'That's good, because that's a good cover, because now you are working for me'. And that's when my life changed."

He also explained why he didn't just say no, saying he was in a bad head space after being dropped by the Kiwis and vulnerable: "I think I felt greedy for the first time in my life.

"I probably had a chip on my shoulder over my career, I left New Zealand pretty heart broken and a bit angry at the system.

"And as the match fixing world opened up to me… I thought 'yeah, I'm going to make some big money now, so stuff the world'."

Vincent also gave an example of how the fixing worked, saying his job was to score 10 to 15 runs at the top of the order and then get out. But one time he hit a six instead of going out, and he knew there would be repercussions.

He explained: "I could tell straight away that I'd done wrong. I got the phone call to come meet the person I was working for.

"He sat me down on the bed, walked away and got a cricket bat and… he was walking towards me with a killer look in his eye and I thought 'oh well this is pretty serious'.

"I was really surprised that he didn't follow through and hit me."

Vincent didn't hear from the bookie again until he moved to England, when he was approached again: "It was a phone call out of nowhere by the person I was working for in (India) who happened to be in England at the same time.

"I was forgiven and told that I had to earn trust back with him and his people… I was told to underperform and prove that I was trustworthy.

"I thought that I might get paid. I might see my money."

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