Amir: Match-fixing must be criminal offence

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Former Pakistan fast bowler Mohammad Amir insisted match- and spot-fixing be legally viewed as criminal offences.

Former Pakistan fast bowler Mohammad Amir insisted match- and spot-fixing be legally viewed as criminal offences.

Amir, alongside fellow seamer Mohammad Asif and ex-captain Salman Butt, were banned for deliberately bowling no-balls during a Test against England in 2010.

"I don't know what powers or authority the ICC has but definitely it needs to make fixing of matches a criminal offence and there should be jail sentences for those involved in this racket," said Amir.

"It can be termed as invasion of privacy but the biggest thing they must do is to keep track of all calls made and received on phones of players and officials involved in a bilateral series or tournament.

"The ICC must keep track and monitor numbers of all potential and known bookmakers, who lure players into the fixing racket. And anyone found guilty must face criminal charges."

Left-armer Amir clinched 51 wickets in 14 matches before a promising career was stifled by 2010's misgivings. He has since participated in the International Cricket Council's anti-corruption campaign.

"Someone who has made up his mind to do something wrong will not be affected by these programs. The point is that if players know anyone who tries to corrupt them will face proper criminal charges they will be quick to report any approach or offer or unusual activity to the ICC anti-corruption and security unit officers or their team management," he added.

"One day I was creating a world record and next day I was facing spot-fixing charges. I have been through tough times and have learnt from them. The biggest lesson has been that there is enough legal money to be made from cricket and it is best for players to avoid negative and bad company."

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