Clarke: No room for corruption in Australian team

Australia

Captain Michael Clarke has insisted Australian cricketers were not involved in recent allegations of match- and spot-fixing across domestic competitions in Bangladesh, India and England.

Captain Michael Clarke has insisted Australian cricketers were not involved in recent allegations of match- and spot-fixing across domestic competitions in Bangladesh, India and England.

Former New Zealand batsman Lou Vincent recently revealed participation in an International Cricket Council anti-corruption investigation in February last year.

Vincent said he had been approached by an illegal bookmaker during the 2013 Bangladesh Premier League – and has allegedly reported attempted fixing during England's domestic limited-overs contests.

Current Black Caps captain Brendon McCullum, meanwhile, has reportedly implicated erstwhile all-rounder Chris Cairns in a historic testimony to the ICC's anti-corruption and security unit – but is not under investigation for spot- or match-fixing.

"As an Australian cricketer, I'm very proud of what this current team has done and achieved and I think we are educated very well in what is right and what is wrong," said Clarke.

"I'm extremely confident about the players I'm playing with, this Australian team, all know very clearly that there's no room for corruption in our team. A big part of our job is to uphold the integrity of our sport and I think we do that well."

Ex-batsman Mark Waugh and leg-spinner Shane Warne were privately fined for accepting cash from an Indian bookmaker – in exchange for weather and pitch information – in 1995. The punishments were only revealed publicly three years later.

"These days you get educated from a very young age, I think once you come into the state system, even as a rookie contract. So for some guys it starts at 16 years of age," added Clarke.

"I can only talk about Australian players, but in this country we are very well educated and I'm very happy, satisfied and confident that Australian players are making the right decisions.

"I don't think we should be tarring all cricketers, it's a minority that is dealing with these sort of issues and I'd be disappointed if the fans of cricket think this is happening more than it is."

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