ICC: Hot Spot stays for final Ashes Tests

Australia

Controversial Decision Review System tool Hot Spot will be used in the final two Ashes Tests, say the ICC, after discussing the technology's recent troubles with England and Australia players and coaches.

Controversial Decision Review System tool Hot Spot will be used in the final two Ashes Tests, say the ICC, after discussing the technology's recent troubles with England and Australia players and coaches.

ICC general manager Geoff Allardice went to Durham to meet with the squads ahead of the fourth Test, to discuss the various issues that cropped up in the first three matches, ranging from poor umpiring to Hot Spot failures.

The GM said the meeting went well, and that players showed support for DRS after a number of former players and pundits called for the system to be scrapped, saying Hot Spot in particular was unreliable.

Allardice said of the meeting: "We acknowledge that the DRS has not performed as effectively during the past three Tests as it has in other series.

"The purpose of my visit was to meet with the teams to listen to their feedback, and to identify potential improvements to DRS moving forward. It was very encouraging to hear both teams reiterate their support for the use of DRS.

"Some of the ideas that were suggested during the meetings could improve the system, and will be considered further by the ICC."

Allardice also defended Hot Spot, which has come under fire during the Ashes after seemingly not picking up faint edges, and the inventor admitting it sometimes struggled against fast bowling compared to spin.

Allardice said: "Hot Spot is an advanced technology that helps us to detect edges. It is conclusive – when there is a mark we know the bat has hit the ball.

"In working with the operator over several years, we know that the majority of edges are detected by Hot Spot, but there are occasions when a fine edge isn't picked up.

"If there is no mark on Hot Spot, the TV umpire can use replays from different angles to see whether the ball has deflected off the bat, and he can listen to the sound from the stump-microphone to determine whether the batsman has edged the ball.

"Either deflection or sound can be used by the TV umpire to make his final judgment."

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