Kumble warns BCCI to use power 'lightly'

India

Former India spinner has cautioned the BCCI against using their growing influence over the game in a negative manner, saying they have a responsibility to protect the game and not use their strength for selfish ends.

Former India spinner has cautioned the BCCI against using their growing influence over the game in a negative manner, saying they have a responsibility to protect the game and not use their strength for selfish ends.

Kumble was speaking at the MAK Pataudi lecture in Mumbai, and made rare, if veiled, criticisms of his home board's growing perceived 'bully' status. He said that while India were a superpower in terms of influence and money, they needed to keep the game as the priority.

Kumble said: "There has been a shift in the balance of power. It is extremely important that we wear our power lightly and make contributions that are worthy of emulation, because, cricket has to be above every other consideration.

"It is ironic that the rest of the cricketing world has accepted India's lead role rather more easily and with greater pragmatism than India have.

"Notwithstanding the position of pre-eminence we enjoy both on and off the field, it is extremely important for us to demonstrate leadership with responsibility.

"Traditionally, our leadership style has relied less on belligerence and more on driving consensus. It is important that the development of cricket and its popularity among its member nations are protected and nurtured."

He went on to say that even if nations like Australia and England could have been seen as autocratic in the past, it didn't mean India had to do the same, and actually had the responsibility to change that mindset.

He added: "Power can be a heady thing, but with power comes responsibility. We must prepare to adapt to the change, embrace it and respond to it in the manner that serves the game best.

"History has shown that it is in their periods of overwhelming superiority that nations sow the seeds of their fall from grace. It was true of the Roman Empire; it was true of the British Empire.

"The analogy can be extended to cricket. As the most significant and influential cricketing country, we must guard against repeating historical mistakes."

Latest