Rogers: Aussies relieved not to face Ajmal

Australia

Australia Test opener Chris Rogers feels his side will cope well with the spin from Pakistan in the upcoming tour to the UAE, and that they will adapt to the conditions, even without Saeed Ajmal to face.

Australia Test opener Chris Rogers feels his side will cope well with the spin from Pakistan in the upcoming tour to the UAE, and that they will adapt to the conditions, even without Saeed Ajmal to face.

Rogers said that while Pakistan will be without banned Ajmal, they still have a number of top class slow bowlers, and that those players will do a lot of the hard graft in the hot, dry conditions.

The veteran opener said: "Spin will still be a big factor with the heat. They still have (Abdur) Rehman who's an exceptional bowler and no doubt there's going to be other spinners available.

"Spin's going to be an important factor in the series. Whatever wickets they come up with, we're going to have to adapt.

"It looks like we've picked a good squad that covers all bases so we can be fairly confident whatever's thrown at us (that we can) adapt to it."

Rogers added that while he felt for Ajmal, the Aussies, not traditionally the best at facing spin, were not overly disappointed at not having to face the prolific spinner.

He said: "It's a tough one and I feel for the guy, but obviously it makes it easier for us because his record is amazing.

"And (his omission) probably (helps) me as well because off-spin has been a bit of a problem. Unfortunate for him but not a bad result for us."

Rogers also went on to say that while he was pleased to see the ICC taking chucking seriously, he though there could be an improvement in the consistency of the testing and policing.

When asked if the system worked, he added: "Yeah I do, but I think it's a little bit inconsistent.

"I play (at Middlesex) with a guy named Ollie Rayner who had to have his action modified a few years back and I don't think he was anywhere near the level of degree some other people have got to.

"It has to be some kind of uniform procedure and the same rules apply to everyone. I don't have a huge background in it, but I think it's important.

"The rules are policed. Other people's careers are affected if these rules are being exceeded."

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