Survey: Aussie players loathe pink ball

Australia

The Australian Cricketers' Association have done a survey with players who played day-night cricket with a pink ball in the Sheffield Shield last year, and the overwhelming feeling is that the players loathe the entire thing.

The Australian Cricketers' Association have done a survey with players who played day-night cricket with a pink ball in the Sheffield Shield last year, and the overwhelming feeling is that the players loathe the entire thing.

Of the players questioned, 94 percent said the pink ball played nothing like a red Kookaburra, while a majority said they would not want to play day-night Tests, as is being pushed for by Cricket Australia.

ACA chief Paul Marsh told <i>Cricinfo</i>: "The ball itself, they [the players] were quite critical of it. The general feedback was that it went soft very quickly, the ball didn't swing, it didn't seam, it didn't reverse swing.

"So it became a ball that was very difficult to get batsmen out with, but it was also difficult to score runs because it got soft quickly.

"The thing the game probably needs to look at here is that given the way the ball performed, the risk is that with no movement and the ball getting very soft, it could result in a very, very boring game of cricket. That's the risk.

"It might increase the excitement levels by having a day-night Test match, but you may actually lose out by having a ball that doesn't do anything.

"That's something that they've got to keep working on. The first day-night Test match, no matter what the ball is I'm sure people will turn up and it will rate well because it's new, but you've got to look beyond the first one or two games and look at the sustainability of it.

"I'd encourage them to keep investing in trying to find a ball that fits the purpose, because at the moment our view is that the pink ball is not."

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