Trott: Aussies are all talk, no wins

England

England batsman Jonathan Trott is amused by Australia coach Darren Lehmann's comments ahead of the return Ashes leg Down Under next month, saying the Aussies always talk a big game.

England batsman Jonathan Trott is amused by Australia coach Darren Lehmann's comments ahead of the return Ashes leg Down Under next month, saying the Aussies always talk a big game but haven't followed it up with positive results.

England won the Ashes three-nil at home, but Lehmann was critical of England's approach, calling it boring and 'dour'. He also called Stuart Broad a 'blatant cheat' for not walking in Nottingham, a comment he was later fined for.

But Trott wasn't bothered by these comments, pointing out that talking a big game meant nothing if you didn't back it up with some victories, and he much preferred the way England coach Andy Flower approached matters.

Trott said on <i>BBC Sport</i>: "I'd take another dour 3-0 in Australia. I know Australians are a confident bunch of guys, but they've lost the Ashes series and they are making comments already.

"That's just the Australian way, that's how they are – I think we go about our cricket a little bit differently. I look at it this way. Our head coach isn't on Twitter, their head coach is."

Trott admittedly didn't have the best Ashes in England, averaging under 30 and recording just two half centuries, prompting the Aussies to say they had worked him out. But Trott laughed that off, saying he would come back strongly Down Under.

The Warwickshire man said: "When you don't score runs people like to think they've worked you out, but sometimes that's cricket, things just don't go your way.

"I've been working really hard to put a few things right technically and work things out and make sure I get to Australia playing really well."

The former South Africa under-19 player was also asked about the 'England-born players only' debate fired up by footballer Jack Wilshire, and Trott said that he and Kevin Pietersen, both of whom moved to England as adults, were just as committed to the side as home-born players.

The Cape Town-born batsman said: "Everyone in that changing room knows that when I'm batting or Kevin is batting, nobody wants to score more runs for England than the two of us.

"The pride and the honour that we have every time we pull on an England shirt and walk out to bat should be good enough for anyone.

"Just because our accents aren't the same as the people who make these comments, it doesn't mean we want it less."

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