Aussies lead by 530 on horror day for England

Australia

Australia held a lead of 530 runs at stumps on day three of the second Ashes Test, after a Mitchell Johnson lesson in fast bowling saw England all out for 172 and the moustached paceman taking seven wickets.

Australia held a lead of 530 runs at stumps on day three of the second Ashes Test, after a Mitchell Johnson lesson in fast bowling saw England all out for 172 and the moustached paceman taking seven wickets.

Only half centuries from Michael Carberry and Ian Bell ensured a score above 100 as the rest of the order were sent packing cheaply and Johnson nearly taking two hat-tricks, pushing the speed gun to 95 mph.

Three wickets for England then saw the Aussies reaching the close on 132 for three in Adelaide, but David Warner was solid on 83 as the lead, on 398 at the start of the knock, only became more daunting.

England began the day on 35 for one, having lost Alastair Cook late on day two, bowled by Johnson when his pace was at its highest with the new ball. This left Joe Root and Carberry to try and begin the day well.

They did not. Root was out for 15 off 60 balls, adding just six runs to his overnight score before being caught by Chris Rogers off Nathan Lyon. Peter Siddle then removed Kevin Pietersen for four a few overs later.

This left Carberry and Bell to put on a stand of 45 runs over the next 11 overs, before a brilliant catch by Warner saw Carberry back in the hut. He'd made 60 off 144 balls, and 40 of those runs came from boundaries.

Bell then had to watch as the rest of the order succumbed to magic Johnson. Debutant Ben Stokes made just one run, while Matt Prior, Stuart Broad and James Anderson were all out for ducks. The latter two were first-ballers.

The final stand between Bell, who ended on 72 not out, and Monty Panesar was a valiant one, with the spinner batting for 35 deliveries for his two runs and showing much courage, but his stumps were rattled before tea to give Johnson his seventh wicket.

The Aussies soon found themselves two down for four runs, but that was effectively 402 for two. Still, James Anderson bowled with his usual dedication to get rid of Chris Rogers and Shane Watson in quick succession.

Michael Clarke and Warner then pushed the score to 65 in the evening session, with Warner the more aggressive of the two. He quickly reached a half century, while Clarke made 22 before being bowled by Panesar.

The final hour was seen out by Warner and Steve Smith, who successfully used DRS to overturn an LBW out decision. He'd not played a shot so the 'struck outside the line' part was moot, but the ball was missing the off stump completely.

With two days to go, it now remains to be seen how soon Clarke will declare on day four, and if England can bat out the rest of the game, as chasing the score down is almost beyond the realms of possibility.

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