Australia hit back in Barbados

Australia

Having entered the day under pressure, Australia turned the tables on the West Indies with some lower-order resistance and early strikes leaving the hosts fighting for survival at the close on day four.

Having entered the day under pressure, Australia turned the tables on the West Indies with some lower-order resistance and early strikes leaving the hosts fighting for survival at the close on day four.
Rarely does one see a game turn as much as this one did in the first two sessions in Barbados as the West Indies saw the initiative well and truly wrestled from them, all on a day which had started promisingly.
Having begun proceedings still 201 runs behind, Australia lost Michael Hussey (48) and Peter Siddle (0) with just two further runs added.
The last of the recognised batsmen, Matthew Wade, departed for 28 with the score on 285. But while only two scalps were needed from there on in, the West Indies found them the hardest to grab.
Ryan Harris was first joined by a belligerent Ben Hilfenhaus (24) with whom he put on 44 before the later was bowled attempting one big shot too many and then by last man in Nathan Lyon.
Harris and Lyon frustrated the hosts for more than 25 overs, notching up 77 as the hosts flagged, looking listless and at a loss for ideas.
With Harris (68*) and Lyon (40*) having reduced the deficit to just 43 runs, Michael Clarke made an aggressive decision to declare despite still being behind, looking to make the most of an obvious shift in momentum.
Clarke couldn't have dreamt that his bowlers would respond quite so well to his decision.
Hilfenhaus was in devastating form, first bowling Adrian Barath (two) through the gate before Kraigg Brathwaite (duck) – who had batted so well in the first innings – flashed at a wide one, feathering it to Wade behind the stumps.
The big Tasmanian was not done either, returning in his next over to catch Kirk Edwards (one) lbw. The end result was that the hosts headed in to tea in tatters, reduced to 4/3.
Harris returned after the break to dismiss Shivnarine Chanderpaul for twelve but what followed was a period of rebuilding as Darren Bravo and Narsingh Deonarine dug their heels in against an aging ball that produced less of a threat.
The pair looked set to see out the day before Peter Siddle chipped in with the wicket of Bravo – caught behind for 32 – inside the final half hour of play.
At the close, the West Indies were 71 for five, with a lead of 114 runs. The hosts are far from dead and buried, but with a sniff of victory, Clarke's me will be determined to finish the job on day five.

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