England need four, Oz need 137

Australia

England were in the driving seat at stumps on day four of the first Ashes Test at Trent Bridge, taking four evening wickets to leave Australia teetering on the edge of defeat on 174 for six, still 137 runs behind.

England were in the driving seat at stumps on day four of the first Ashes Test at Trent Bridge, taking four evening wickets to leave Australia teetering on the edge of defeat on 174 for six, still 137 runs behind.

Australia are chasing a formidable, and unheard of at Trent Bridge, score of 311 to win, after dismissing England for 375 half an hour before lunch. Openers Chris Rogers and Shane Watson put on 84 together, making English hearts thump loudly, before England recovered.

The highest successful run chase at Trent Bridge is 284, and the wicket is dry and spinning like a top. Given how many wickets have fallen in morning sessions, the Aussies will have to bat like they have never batted before on day five, just to get close to that.

England started the day on 326 for six, with Ian Bell on 95 and Stuart Broad on 47. The pair continued for seven overs in the morning, just enough time to reach their innings milestones.

Bell's century (109) was particularly impressive, given his poor form coming into the match and the pressure on him on a difficult deck. Most pundits praised it as his most important and impressive ton.

Broad was the first to depart, catching a healthy edge off James Pattinson in the 140th over for 65. Brad Haddin took a nifty low catch, and umpire Kumar Dharmasena's finger was in the air soon after, so Broad walked off after 148 deliveries in the middle.

Bell could only add 14 runs to his overnight score, before also gifting Haddin with a catch. His edge was feather-light, but the umpire and players were doubt-free, the Trent Bridge fans giving Bell a standing ovation as he departed.

The final two wickets, those of Graeme Swann and James Anderson, fell in the same over, as Peter Siddle wrapped up the innings.

The Aussies batted out seven overs before lunch, recording 28 without loss. They came out after the break and continued in a positive vein, with only an edge that dropped short giving Rogers anything to worry about initially.

He did survive a catch claim later on though, after reviewing Kumar Dharmasena's 'out' decision. Hot spot showed no edge, and it was a clear miss with the bat. A review of the LBW option also showed the ball missing the stumps.

England nerves were calmed slightly by the dismissals of Watson, for 46, and Cowan, for 14. The top successful chase here is 284, and at one stage the Aussies were making that look like an easy option.

Watson was trapped LBW by Broad, and a review did not save him as it clipped the leg stump. Cowan was caught in the slips by Jonathan Trott off spinner Joe Root. This left Australia trailing by 200 at tea, but still looking good.

The evening was a different story, and once Rogers departed just moments after recording his maiden Test fifty, the momentum swung back England's way. They lost three more wickets for just three runs, two to Swann.

Aussie skipper Michael Clarke could only make 23 runs, though using up 70 valuable deliveries, before he was caught behind off Broad. The umpiring again came into the spotlight as they check to see if the ball carried to Matt Prior, which is clearly had.

Clarke then reviewed the catch, but Hot Spot showed a faint mark and he may have been hoping the technology would be having a problem, like it did for Joe Root and Jonathan Trott's dismissals.

Swann then bagged Steve Smith and Phil Hughes in rapid succession, leaving Brad Haddin and first innings hero Ashton Agar to see out the day. It was incredibly tense as both batsmen lived dangerously, but they survived. Haddin had 11 runs, and Agar, promoted to eight, just one off 24 balls.

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