Pakistan lose first Test to Zimbabwe in 15 years

News

A second-innings five-wicket haul from seamer Tendai Chatara resigned Pakistan to a historic 24-run defeat to Zimbabwe on day five of the second and final Test at the Harare Sports Club on Saturday.

A second-innings five-wicket haul from seamer Tendai Chatara resigned Pakistan to a historic 24-run defeat to Zimbabwe on day five of the second and final Test at the Harare Sports Club.

The nations had not seen such a result since November 1998, when former fast bowlers Heath Streak and Henry Olonga outgunned a formidable home order led by the veteran Inzamam-ul-Haq and Mohammad Yousuf.

Saturday was always going to bring a pressurised passage of play, as Pakistan resumed on 158 for five – still 106 runs shy of a testing target. The hosts, meanwhile, remained hot in pursuit of a closing quintet of wickets.

Chatara landed the initial blow, removing steely wicketkeeper-batsman Adnan Akmal during the day's opening throes. Once again, considerably low bounce accounted for a straightforward decision – as was the case with tail-ender Saeed Ajmal's departure later.

Aspiring all-rounder Abdur Rehman, rectifying a first-innings duck, inspired the fightback. Fast bowler Tinashe Panyangara, however, was ultimately at hand to end the resistance. Skipper Misbah-ul-Haq, though, remained firm.

His presence at the crease was entirely pivotal and, shepherding tail-ender Junaid Khan, ensured the contest spanned beyond the lunch break. The enterprising Misbah, eager to take the attack to the dominating opposition bowlers, cherished a flurry of late boundaries.

But the new ball loomed, and soon took its toll. With Junaid holing out to gully and number 11 Rahat Ali run out at the non-striker's end, the momentous outcome was sealed – and the two-match series squared.

Chatara was named Man of the Match and batsman Younis Khan heralded as Player of the Series, while Pakistan were left to lament a fall from fourth to sixth in the International Cricket Council Test rankings.

Latest